Benefits of topical estrogen in the treatment of urogenital menopause syndrome

December 21, 2021
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Resume

The article presents the clinical signs of urogenital menopausal syndrome, which is a clinical reflection of complex interactions at the level of the estrogen receptor apparatus. Natural decrease in estrogen levels leads to a gradual increase in symptoms in women. Pathogenetically determined therapy of urogenital menopausal syndrome is estrogen replacement therapy. Systemic therapy can reduce the severity of symptoms, but its use is limited by a number of side effects. Topical agents have a good tolerability profile, a short period of time to achieve an effect in the tissues, the possibility of repetitive courses with minimal risk to the target tissues of the uterus and breast. Topical estriol therapy can effectively help patients with estrogen deficiency conditions caused by urogenital menopausal syndrome.

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