Readiness of rehabilitation specialists to use modern information and communication technologies to provide continuous rehabilitation to patients with injuries

April 21, 2021
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The aim is to investigate and determine the readiness and potential use of information and communication technologies by rehabilitation specialists to provide effective continuous rehabilitation to patients with injuries in current conditions.

Object and methods of research. System approach and system analysis, sociological and statistical research methods were used. The study involved 62 rehabilitation specialists, the survey was conducted remotely using specially designed questionnaires of 25 questions.

Results. 64.5±12.0% of respondents consider it expedient and effective to use modern information and communication technologies and telemedicine in rehabilitation. 48.4±12.5% of the surveyed specialists are ready to use modern communication technologies in the rehabilitation of their patients during quarantine, 30.6±11.5% of specialists indicated that they are ready, but do not have the opportunity to do so, and 21.0±10.2% of respondents indicated that they were not ready because they considered them ineffective. 45.2±12.5% of respondents are ready to join the development of online rehabilitation programs, their methodological support, sites and services of modern information technologies to ensure continuous rehabilitation of patients. The main obstacles and risks of telerehabilitation in the opinion of the interviewed rehabilitation specialists were identified.

Conclusions. A high level (79.0%) of readiness of rehabilitation specialists to use modern information and communication technologies in the rehabilitation of patients with injuries in their practice and an average level (45.2%) of readiness to participate in the development of online rehabilitation programs, their methodological support, sites and services of modern information technologies.

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