Features of visual functions in persons living in the ATO zone as a marker of posttraumatic stress disorder

March 6, 2019
677
Resume

Aim — to determine the possibility of using studies of pupils’ state as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) markers in people living in the ATO zone and to compare it with healthy individuals. The main group was formed by 120 people living in the ATO zone with symptoms of PTSD, the control group consisted of 80 people living in Odessa and the Odessa region. The study of visual acuity, refractometry, ophthalmoscopy, binocular vision of the nearest point of clear vision, the calculation of the volume of accommodation, convergence, saccadic eye movements and pupillometry were conducted. It was established that the diameter of the pupils in the main group is larger, the nearest point of convergence is further, and the volume of accommodation is much smaller in comparison with the control group. A direct positive correlation was established between the diameter of the pupil and the nearest point of convergence — 0.71 (p<0.05). The distant visual acuity in all patients was 1.0, the proximate visual acuity was lower in the main group in comparison with the control group (0.7±0.3 and 0.85±0.25; p=0.0001). Conclusions. The pupils in persons living in the ATO zone were significantly larger, the nearest point of convergence was further and the volume of accommodation was significantly lower in comparison to the persons in the control group (p<0.05). A direct positive reliable correlation was established between the diameter of the pupil and the nearest point of convergence — 0.71 (p<0.05).

Published: 06.03.2019

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